Tom Alcraft: Protecting Children’s Oral Health

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Tom Alcraft: Children’s oral health, why tools, as well as the message, matter

Protecting children’s oral health from an early age gives them a better future, hopefully one without invasive treatments, including extractions. By practising good oral hygiene every day and with regular attendance to dental appointments, they will increase their chances of maintaining a healthy and beautiful smile for a lifetime.

Pre-pandemic statistics for children’s oral health were concerning, and drew attention to huge regional variations, with poorer areas reporting a far greater incidence of childhood decay. Improving children’s oral health means actively engaging with their parents and carers, plus education through nurseries and schools. The message of prevention has never been more important.

The myth that milk teeth don’t need looking after, because they are going to fall out anyway, must be shattered. Milk teeth are more susceptible to cavities, because their structure is less mineralised than permanent teeth; and any decay will progress more quickly, which could enable an infection to take hold.

An abscessed tooth is miserable at any age, but for children it can mean missing school and social withdrawal. Dental pain will disrupt sleep, and may inhibit chewing and speaking. Diet is also a factor for childhood caries – particularly the hidden sugars in things such as fruit juice, raisins and breakfast cereals. Parents and carers are advised to consult the packaging before offering any foods and drinks to very young children.

Milk teeth should be brushed as soon as they erupt. A child’s toothbrush should be soft, so there is no injury to the surrounding gingiva, which can feel tender when teeth are coming through. To help babies get used to the feel of a brush, the Curaprox Teether has a built-in toothbrush then, when the first tooth pushes through, they can graduate to the super-soft Curaprox Baby Brush.

Also, coming soon is Curaprox Kids, a new toothbrush and toothpaste range. The CS Kids brush is suitable for ages 4-12, with densely packed, extra-fine CUREN bristles, a compact brush head and a round handle to prevent excessive pressure which is comfortable for both child and adult hands to hold.

The CS Kids is sold in handy twin packs – one brush for the parent or carer, and one for the child to get used to holding while their fine motor skills are still developing. Use it to apply one of the four new Curaprox Kids’ toothpastes, with varying concentrations of fluoride. The toothpastes also contain enzymes to support saliva’s protective role and xylitol, but no Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), which can be irritating to the oral cavity.

Author:


Tom Alcraft, Curaden UK Commercial Director UK & Ireland, was writing on behalf of Curaprox. For more information, call 01480 862084, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.curaprox.co.uk